January, 2015

Bounce Back from Identity Theft | The First National Bank Blog

January 27th, 2015
Bounce Back from Identity Theft | The First National Bank Blog image

  If it hasn’t happened to you, it’s probably happened to someone you know. A stolen credit, debit or ATM card turns into a huge financial headache that takes months to sort out. In the best case scenario, you notice the stolen card before any fraudulent transactions occur. You call the card issuer, cancel the account and get on with your life. The worst case scenario is a lot more complex. The stolen card is used quickly and racks up thousands of dollars in transactions before you realize what’s happened. Identity thieves can even set up new accounts in your [ read more ]

Protect Yourself from Identity Theft

January 20th, 2015
Protect Yourself from Identity Theft image

Credit card fraud, where thieves use stolen cards for unauthorized purchases, affects nearly 10 million people every year. And while credit card theft is a hassle, it’s not as serious as identity theft where thieves use stolen credit or debit cards to open new accounts under the victim’s name. Although true identity theft is relatively uncommon, the effects can be devastating. The First’s shared blog from The Wall Street Journal shows you how to prevent identity theft. http://guides.wsj.com/personal-finance/credit/how-to-protect-yourself-from-identity-theft/ [ read more ]

My Credit Card Was Stolen. What Now? | The First National Bank Blog

January 13th, 2015
My Credit Card Was Stolen. What Now? | The First National Bank Blog image

It’s January and the holiday credit card bills are trickling in. Unfortunately, there are charges to your account that you just can’t account for. After checking with family members who may have used your credit cards, you realize that your card or card information was stolen. Act Fast! Always keep the 24-hour fraud numbers for your cards handy because prompt action limits your liability for unauthorized use of credit cards, as well as ATM and debit cards. Once you report a stolen card to the issuer, you can’t be held liable for any unauthorized transactions. While many card issuers have a [ read more ]